New Haven Hiroshima/Nagasaki commemorations; Averting a far worse repeat.

You are invited to participate in this year’s annual New Haven commemoration of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki:

  • Saturday Aug. 6, 8AM, New Haven Green Flagpole; and
  • Tuesday Aug. 9, 10:45AM, Amistad Statue next to City Hall 165 Church St.

Please see attached flier.

Sadako Sasaki (Sasaki Sadako, January 7, 1943 – October 25, 1955) was a Japanese girl who became a victim of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki by the United States. She was two years of age when the bombs were dropped and was severely irradiated. She survived for another ten years, becoming one of the most widely known hibakusha—a Japanese term meaning “bomb-affected person”. She is remembered through the story of the more than one thousand origami cranes she folded before her death. She died at the age of 12 in October 1955. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sadako_Sasaki)

A terrible, grave danger today comes with the bloody war in Ukraine with the two nuclear-weapons superpowers, Russia and the USA, on opposite sides of the conflict, which could escalate into the use of nuclear weapons. The US government and the US media are ignoring the real potential that the longer this conflict continues, the greater the possibility that such weapons will be used.

Let us warn our elected officials in Washington to take actions to stop this war, insist on urgent, honest negotiations for peace.

In Wake Of Cox Case, Looney Vows To Reintroduce Medical-Aid Bill; March is Planned

by Paul Bass, New Haven Independent

After what happened to Richard ​Randy” Cox, New Haven State Sen. Martin Looney said, he has new evidence to support passage of a state law requiring ​immediate emergency medical services to an individual who experiences a health emergency” while in police custody.

Looney, the State Senate’s president pro tempore, proposed such a law in this year’s legislative session: Senate Bill 445, An Act Concerning the Provision of Emergency Medical Services to an Individual Who Is in the Custody or Control of a Peace Officer.

The Senate passed the bill 34 – 0 on April 26.

But it never made it to the floor of the state House of Representatives. So the bill died. It didn’t become law.

Then, on June 19, Richard Cox’s head slammed against the wall of a police conveyance van when the driver slammed on the brakes. He injured his neck and back; he couldn’t move. Rather than get him immediate attention, the cops brought the 36-year-old New Haven man to the lock-up, ordered him to stand, accused him of lying about his injuries, placed him in a wheelchair, then dragged him on the floor to a cell, before an ambulance crew took him to the hospital.

Read more here: In Wake Of Cox Case, Looney Vows To Reintroduce Medical-Aid Bill 

When the Supreme Court decides, we’ll rally for reproductive justice and LGBTQ Freedom

The day is fast approaching when the Supreme Court will make a decision that could ban abortion in over half of the country and take away LGBTQ+ rights as well.

New Haven Reproductive Justice Mobilization is a coalition of people-powered organizations and individuals who are protesting and raising our voices in New Haven, CT since the Supreme Court leak. We can’t sit back and wait for politicians and lawyers to change things. It takes all of us, women, LGBTQ+ people, workers, feminists, immigrants, and all kinds of people to build our power and tell our stories. Join the national day of action on the Day of Decision. In New Haven, we will occupy the steps of the Federal Courthouse from 5:00 pm to 8:00 pm.

There is no way to predict when the Day of Decisions will occur. Sign up to get a text message alert on the day of the ruling! (You can unsubscribe at any time. We will send occasional emails & texts about related protests and meetings.)

Too Much Pavement at Tweed = Flooding, Pollution, Wildlife Disruption

by Kathy Czepiel, Communications Specialist, Save the Sound

The proposed Tweed-New Haven Airport expansion must undergo a thorough environmental review process, Save the Sound’s legal team asserted in an April 18 letter to the New England Region office of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

While the airport authority has stated its intention to do an Environmental Assessment (EA), we urged the FAA to demand a more rigorous Environmental Impact Statement, as required by the National Environmental Policy Act.

Floodplain and resilience problems related to stormwater flooding and sea-level rise at this vulnerable location are a major concern, especially because the airport’s EA fails to include the impacts of a taxiway expansion that will inevitably be built. Increasing the airport’s footprint could also significantly affect inland and tidal wetlands, local and migratory wildlife habitat and water quality.

An annual community meeting with local officials and the airport authority is scheduled for June 9 at 6 p.m. at the Nathan Hale School cafeteria, 480 Townsend Ave., New Haven.

Come and ask your questions about the proposed expansion and its impact on the environment and human health.

Save the Sound, 900 Chapel St., Suite 2202
New Haven, CT 06510.
phone: 203-787-0646

For more information on Tweed efforts, visit www.10000Hawks.org.

Connecticut to Join Poor Peoples March on Washington June 18

by New Haven Peoples Center

Preparations are underway in Connecticut to join thousands of people from across the country at the June 18, 2022 Mass Poor Peoples and Low-Wage Workers’ Assembly “March on Washington DC and to the Polls,” led by Rev. Dr. William Barber.

“There are 140 million poor and low-income people in this country,” says Barber. “If we unite together, we have the power to overturn the interlocking injustices that keep us all struggling,” including systemic racism, poverty, ecological devastation, militarism and the war economy, and the false moral narrative of religious nationalism.

The New Haven Peoples Center is organizing a charter bus to attend the march in the nation’s capitol. Participants will represent the struggles unfolding in Connecticut since the pandemic demanding racial and economic equality and the rights of essential workers and all workers.

“There are abundant resources to meet our needs, and we march to summon the political will to do so,” says the call to the march referring to rising billionaire wealth and the bloated military budget.

In this session of the Connecticut General Assembly, the Recovery for All coalition and many unions and community and faith groups organized for pandemic pay, work scheduling and other measures to improve conditions for low-wage workers. This week a bill prohibiting employers from requiring attendance at anti-union “captive audience” meetings was signed into law, making it easier for workers who want union representation to organize.

The march on Washington will launch a mass mobilization to register voters and get out the vote this year in response to increased voter suppression efforts across the country.

Organizational partners for the march include over 200 union, faith, peace and environmental justice groups.

March organizers say that the assembly “will be a generationally transformative declaration of the power of poor and low-wealth people and our moral allies to say that this system is killing ALL of us and we can’t…we won’t…WE REFUSE TO BE SILENT ANYMORE.”

The Peoples Center has issued an invitation to young people and everyone to participate in what promises to be an inspiring and historic experience that will boost ongoing organizing in Connecticut.

Bus reservations can be made by filling out this electronic form: https://forms.gle/ZVuHK5fjWSb3KHFG8 or leaving a phone message at 203-624-8664.

Build Back Better: End the New Nuclear Arms Races

by The CT Committee for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons

[Vice President Kamala Harris was met by demonstrators when she spoke in New London on May 18 at the graduation of the Coast Guard Academy. The following is from the email calling for people to join the demonstration.]

The Biden-Harris Administration proposed a new economic agenda to Build Back Better, investing in children and caregivers, affordable healthcare, housing, education, and clean energy technologies, while increasing jobs and improving our quality of life. However, billions of dollars are flowing into the modernization of nuclear weapons, including the Columbia-class submarine and weapons for Ukraine. While U.S. nuclear doctrine is “Mutually Assured Destruction,” the war in Ukraine fans nuclear tensions between the United States and Russia, who collectively possess more than 90% of the world’s nuclear weapons. For more info, email: nuclearbanct@gmail.com.

The Voluntown Peace Trust posted the above photo and following update on its Facebook page.

The Voluntown Peace Trust posted the above photo and following update on its Facebook page.

This morning, as Vice President Kamala Harris spoke at the Coast Guard Academy commencement ceremony, 18 demonstrators gathered nearby with signs to remind the visiting Vice President of an important message: that we cannot adequately fund the national infrastructure at home while also funding war-making abroad at the same time.

Thank you to everyone who came out to the demonstration, and thanks to Jonathan Daly-LaBelle for the photo.

May Day Celebration on the New Haven Green

by Melinda Tuhus, CT Climate Crisis Mobilization

This year’s May Day on the Green in New Haven marked International Workers Day with a new generation of activists. That was the view of Paula and Frank Panzarella, who initiated and organized May Days in New Haven for 25 years.

“It was nice to see others pick up the banner,” said Frank, complimenting the work done by Unidad Latina en Acción. “I was glad to see the Latino community come out, and it was great to see new young political activists with a variety of leftist parties. I think John Lugo and Megan Fountain did a really good job of putting it together. It’s hard to do on such a short time frame.”

Frank’s band, the Eclektics, played a long set geared more to the older crowd, joined for some songs by vocalist Renee Luna. A rock band of young musicians expressed their own political views in song. Several Latino bands played on the Green and during the march.

There was a table with literature highlighting the history of May Day, when workers in the U.S. – mostly immigrants – fought to establish the 8-hour workday in 1886. Violence erupted at the Chicago protest and police arrested the organizers; several were hanged. Those workers’ struggles for decent wages, working conditions, and dignity sparked the workers’ movement celebrated around the world on May Day.

“There was a reason why May 1 was picked to be the day to push for immigrant rights starting in 2006,” said Paula.

Speakers mentioned current fights for workers’ rights; the need for socialism; the connection between immigration and the climate crisis and why groups espousing immigrant rights and action on climate must work together to achieve their goals; and the fight for universal health care, among other issues. A member of ULA demanded “hero pay” for essential workers who risked their lives during the pandemic. Rep. Robyn Porter, co-chair of the state legislature’s Labor Committee, said the General Assembly has expanded health care for undocumented children to 12 and under from 8 and under, but she is fighting to extend it to age 18. She added that those under 12 who sign up will be covered until age 18.

The Haven free clinic offered free COVID test kits and masks, and Griffin Hospital had a tent nearby offering COVID vaccines.

Young children ran around the Green sporting creative face paint. “It was perfect weather to be out and about, joining in a community event, meeting old friends and new people, a relaxed atmosphere for sharing ideas and philosophy, and enjoying fun performances,” Paula said.

“We need to keep the ‘social’ in socialism to work together to figure things out,” Frank added. “I think it’s getting stronger. I’m glad they did the march because the issues for immigrants are still out there.”

After the four-hour celebration on the Green, complete with an endless supply of pizza (“the workers’ food,” John quipped), young and older set off on a march around downtown, stopping at points of protest or celebration – like recent moves to unionize at the College Street Music Hall and at a hotel on Chapel Street. The march ended on the campus of Yale University, where marchers demanded that Yale – with an endowment that ballooned to $42.3 billion during the pandemic – contribute more to its impoverished host city, especially when low-income residents are being pushed out due to rapidly rising rents.

100 Rally for Abortion Rights

by Maya McFadden, New Haven Independent, May 4, 2022

In the wake of a reported pending U.S. Supreme Court decision to outlaw Roe v. Wade, New Haven activists are demanding that the nation follow in the footsteps of countries like Colombia, Argentina, and Mexico where abortion is a protected human right.

Those cries from protesters echoed over the New Haven Green Tuesday during a city rally calling for “Safe and Legal Abortion “and “Bans Off Our Bodies” organized by Unidad Latina en Acción (ULA), Workers’ Voice CT, and Socialist Revolution.

More than 100 demonstrators stood on the steps of the federal courthouse on 141 Church St. to protest the recent draft of a majority opinion written by conservative Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito suggesting that the nation strike down Roe, which established a federal constitutional right to an abortion. If the court issues that decision in final form, abortion will become largely illegal or access greatly restricted in states throughout the nation.

Leading the speaking program were ULA organizers Rosalba Montoya, Megan Fountain, and Nayeli Garcia.

The rally leaders reminded the crowd of the mass protests in Poland, Ireland, Colombia, Argentina, and Mexico in recent years that resulted in laws allowing safe access to abortions for all.

Together the crowd chanted: “Abortion is a human right,” “Health care is a human right,” “Mi cuerpo, mi decisión” (“My body, my choice”), “What do we want? Free abortion. When do we want it? Now!”

Speakers included a “pro-choice gynecologist,” nursing students, and others, some of whom told stories about being assaulted and needing to get an abortion as a result. Dozens took the microphone one by one in support of free, safe, and legal abortion for their friends and families.

Party for Socialism and Liberation member Kirill Staklo took the mic to add that “we need a new system that defends people’s human rights.”

“And in the state of Connecticut, where we might feel safe, this [decision], if it happens the way that it is threatening to be happening, sets a very dangerous precedent for anybody who cares about privacy and anybody who cares about bodily autonomy,” Staklo added. “No Supreme Court is supreme enough to be supreme over the law of the people.”

[To read the whole article, go to newhavenindependent.org/article/abortion_rights_rally]

West River Peace Garden Needs Volunteers

by Frank Panzarella, volunteer at the Peace Garden

Through the hard work of the City of New Haven Peace Commission, New Haven became a United Nations Peace Messenger City several years ago. In recognition of this distinction, a Peace Garden was established in the West River neighborhood and work was done to lay out a sign and establish a design for the garden.

For several years the garden was tended by the West River Neighborhood Services Corporation, particularly by Stacy Spell, the Board President at that time, and occasionally other volunteers.

A volunteer tends to the New Haven Peace Garden

A volunteer tends to the New Haven Peace Garden

Since then, the original sign was replaced due to weather damage and a new team is working to make major improvements on the garden led by Aaron Goode.

This garden sits at a gateway crossroad for New Haven and will be adjacent to a vibrant new housing construction project in the West River neighborhood.

We want to see this garden become a jewel in the revival of New Haven attractions and a portrait of our values in promoting world peace and peace within our own city.

Included in this garden is a significant donation from the City of Hiroshima: a Ginkgo tree taken from a cutting of a tree that survived the destruction of Hiroshima — a symbol of the tenacity of life.

We need your help to restore the beauty of this garden. Please come and join us, and volunteer to work. We meet every Friday from 9:30 to noon. The garden is located at the end of the Route 34 connector between Martin Luther King Boulevard and Legion Avenue where they meet the Ella Grasso Boulevard. For more information call 203-562-2798 or email frankpanzarella@hotmail.com.

PAR Is Growing!

by PAR Planning Committee

The Progressive Action Roundtable is planning to become an official nonprofit organization. Please help us develop ideas for our growth and build our board of directors.

We are grateful for the solidarity and support from our many loyal readers and want your ideas on how PAR can continue to be relevant and grow as a print newsletter with an electronic presence.

Email us at parnewhaven@hotmail.com, or call Paula at 203-562-2798.

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