The Future of Health Care in Connecticut: Paths to Equity and Good Health for All, April 25

Much of what influences health happens outside the doctor’s office. How can we build strong and meaningful links between the clinical care system and the communities where people live?
Wednesday, April 25, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., join the CT Health Foundation and a panel of experts to explore ways to improve health outcomes and ensure the health care system works for everyone, at the Connecticut Convention Center, 100 Columbus Blvd., Hartford. For information and to register, please contact the CT Health Foundation at (860) 724-1580, email: info@cthealth.org. Free but space is limited so please only register once. If you register and can’t attend, please let us know so we can give your ticket to someone else.

Guest speakers include Dr. David Williams, Norman Professor of Public Health, Harvard Chan School of Public Health; Dr. Soma Stout, Vice President, Institute for Health-care Improvement; Dr. Elisabeth Rosenthal, Editor-in-Chief, Kaiser Health News and author of An American Sickness: How Healthcare Became Big Businessand How You Can Take It Back.

Nonviolent Communication Workshop April 21

Nonviolent Communication is a way of communicating more effectively and compassionately based on the feelings and needs we share as human beings. It is founded on the idea that people only resort to harming themselves and others when they don’t recognize other strategies for meeting their human needs. Imre Berty, who has been teaching Nonviolent Communication for over a decade, will lead this workshop. It is open to all, but it is requested that people read the book, Nonviolent Communication – A Language of Life, before the workshop, so that we will be able to use the time together well.
The workshop is on Saturday, April 21, from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the NH Friends Meetinghouse, 225 E. Grand Ave.

Please bring a bag lunch. If you need child care, please contact Mary Gorham at mary@marygorham.com by April 14 with the names and ages of your children.

Link to event: quakercloud.org/cloud/new-haven-friends-meeting/events/nonviolent-communication-workshop.

More information and to order the book: www.nonviolent communication.com/aboutnvc/4partprocess.htm.

Bringing in The Rain: Workshop March 20

by Lynne Bonnett, New Haven Bioregional Group

It’s been five years since we presented our first Bringing in the Rain session at the Mitchell Library to talk about stormwater runoff, combined sewer overflows and what citizens can do to help clean up our rivers and harbor.

Citizens with their local political representatives convinced CT’s Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) to adopt a watershed-based approach to cleaning up the West River and New Haven Harbor. The City of New Haven, Greater New Haven Water Pollution Control Authority (GNHWPCA), CT Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP), nonprofits and citizen groups have each had a role to play in helping us meet clean water standards in a cost-effective way, saving us money from expensive construction costs while cleaning our waters.

The challenges of reducing raw sewage overflows into the West River and reducing pollution from stormwater runoff are outlined in a West River Watershed Plan. The community has been implementing the plan for the last 3-4 years and we have accomplished a lot.

Come celebrate our efforts Tuesday, March 20, 6-8 p.m. and engage in residential stormwater management—learn how you can get involved. We will have a rain barrel on display with a sign-up sheet if you are interested in getting one for your home, presentations about rain gardens—the easiest and most attractive way to let rain water soak into the ground, and presentations from local schools, researchers and GNHWPCA. Light refreshments, family-friendly, we will start by showing a short film segment from Water Blues, Green Solutions about how community efforts in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, helped reduce pollution from stormwater runoff in their community.
Barnard Nature Center at West River Memorial Park, 200 Derby Ave. (corner of Ella Grasso Blvd,), New Haven.

Lawsuit against State of CT to Restore Clean Energy Funds

by Paula Panzarella, Fight the Hike

Disgracefully, the legislature came up with a state budget that cut the funding for social service agencies and many programs that helped people. This betrayal includes their agreement to give to the General Fund approximately $160 million that consumers already paid into for programs that assist people with energy efficiency, energy conservation and with utilizing renewable energy, which were through the CT Green Bank and the CT Energy Efficiency Fund.

These funds were for the energy programs that we have paid for through the surcharge fee on our United Illuminating and Eversource electric bills. The money was collected specifically to help consumers improve energy efficiency, take part in energy conservation programs, low-interest loans to help with solar panels, modernize furnaces, water heaters, etc.

Besides these programs helping consumers, they have helped build up Connecticut’s economy. There are over 34,000 people working in the energy-efficiency industry in Connecticut. It will be a staggering blow to these businesses and their employees if people cannot continue to have the assistance of these clean-energy programs. The funding for these programs has already been collected to keep these programs going. And the legislators decided to put the money into the General Fund.

Fight the Hike has joined a lawsuit against the state of Connecticut to restore these funds. We hope businesses and other organizations will consider signing on to the lawsuit. Please contact Michael Trahan of SolarConnecticut, Inc. for more information. His e-mail address is mtrahan@solarconnecticut.org and his telephone is  (860) 256-1698.

3rd Saturday Cinema: The War to End All Wars

Film and discussion series at the NHFP Library, 133 Elm St., marks 100 years since the end of World War I. Post screening discussions will be led by New Haven resident and European art, history and politics connoisseur Jacinto Lirola.

March 17 at 2 p.m. Paths of Glory (1957) Director: Stanley Kubrick

April 21 at 2 p.m. All Quiet on the Western Front (1930) Director: Lewis Milestone

May 19 at 2 p.m. Grand Illusion (1937) Director: Jean Renoir

For more info contact Seth at sgodfrey@nhfpl.org or 203-946-7450

Connecticut Fund for the Environment/Save the Sound Development Job Opening

Put your love of the environment to work!

Do you enjoy connecting with donors and prospects who have an interest in protecting and restoring the land, air, and water of Connecticut, New York, and Long Island Sound? You may be the ideal candidate for our Advocates and Special Gifts Officer position. Connecticut Fund for the Environment/Save the Sound is seeking a senior fundraising professional to expand on our proven record in major gift development.

Reporting to the Chief Development Officer, the Advocates and Special Gifts Officer is responsible for identifying, cultivating, soliciting, and stewarding major donors who support CFE and Save the Sound. In particular, s/he will work with the President and Chief Development Officer to develop organizational goals for major donor income, act as primary relationship manager for individual donors and prospects to reach or exceed annual funding goals, develop and execute cultivation and stewardship plans for donors and new prospects, and establish personal benchmarks for and report regularly on donor phone calls, meetings and other contacts.

www.ctenvironment.org/employment

Connecticut Fund for the Environment/Save the Sound, 900 Chapel St., Upper Mezzanine, New Haven, CT 06510. 545 Tompkins Ave., 3rd Floor, Mamaroneck, NY 10543.

The First Unitarian Universalist Society Welcomes You!

The First Unitarian Universalist Society of New Haven is located at 608 Whitney Ave. and hosts many programs for the New Haven community.

The New Haven Bioregional group regularly holds meetings, skillshares, potluck dinners and presentations at our meeting house. New Haven Bioregional Group maintains a lifeboat garden on our property.

ANSWER CT, a chapter of the ANSWER Coalition, regularly holds meetings and events at our meeting house. The ANSWER coalition’s mission is to stop war and racism.

The Children’s Preschool is a non-profit preschool for area children. The school has been located on our property since its founding in 1972, and we are represented on its advisory board.

The New Haven Compassionfest regularly holds meetings and vegan potlucks at our meeting house.
The New Haven/León Sister City Project has their offices in our meeting house. They engage in sustainable economic, human, and community development projects in Nicaragua.
Social Justice and Charitable Giving.

The congregation gives away its weekly collection to organizations pursuing social and environmental justice. We select a different recipient each quarter. We are donating the money collected at this quarter’s services to support Puerto Rico recovery from Hurricane Maria.

Prior recipients include: New Haven Land Trust, CT Food Bank Mobile Pantry, Common Ground High School, CT Fund for the Environment, True Colors, Friends of Haiti Edge of the Woods, Fellowship Place, Inc., SNE Planned Parenthood, Amistad Catholic Worker Hill Area Kitchen, Downtown Soup Kitchen, CT Food Bank — Kids Backpack Program, Stepping Stone Transitional Housing Program, AIDs Project New Haven.

Services are held Sundays 10:30 a.m. Child care is provided 10:15-11:30 a.m. Fellowship and refreshments follow the service. To find out more about the First Unitarian Universalist Society of New Haven, please visit our website at www.uunewhaven.org.

Rock to Rock News and High School Energy Awareness Programs

by Chris Schweitzer, New Haven/León Sister City Project

It’s time to get excited about the 10th Annual Rock to Rock Earth Day Ride. We are joining forces with Green Drinks to put on a Pint Night to benefit Rock to Rock Wednesday, March 14, 6-7:30 at Patagonia, 1 Broadway (corner of York St.), New Haven. We will have beer from Blue Point Brewery, wine, refreshments, live music from Andrew Biagiarelli, and our ever-popular raffle. Admission: $5 donation to Rock to Rock.

Rock to Rock is New Haven’s biggest Earth Day celebration. Here’s how it works: You and about a thousand of your neighbors travel by bicycle from West Rock and East Rock, with celebrations on both sides of the city. Along the way, eat tasty food, hear great music, take on environmental service projects, and explore our city’s parks and neighborhoods. Info: info@rocktorock.org or (203) 285-6147.

Climate Health and Energy Week (CHEW) is an opportunity–April 30 to May 5–for New Haven-area high schools to broaden climate change awareness and engage in concrete action to cut greenhouse gases, improve health and reduce energy use and expense. CHEW organizers are researching and developing–with educators and school administrators–a variety of program/activity options to be available to individual teachers, departments, grade levels, schools, or the entire school district. The range of options will enable educators to meet the specific needs and realities of their school. Other non-school youth and community organiz-ations can also participate.

Check out the website  www.climateweeknh.org or contact Margalie at Margalie Belizaire mbeliza32@gmail.com or call (203) 562-1607.  Also please submit good climate education activities!

Seymour Police, Town of Seymour Policies Discriminate against Disabled

by Joseph A. Luciano  Disability Rights Action Group of CT

I have asked NBC-TV Troubleshooters to investigate the present-day status of ADA access and mobility in downtown Seymour. Investigation can reveal the plight of persons with disabilities (PWDs) living here.

This is happening 27 years after the Americans with Disabil-ities Act (ADA) was enacted (July 26, 1990). That’s 10,100 days ago. This was happening even before Seymour approved 38 new senior/disabled housing units downtown. On Columbus Street alone, the senior/disabled population has increased from 12 to 38—not counting the disabled living in my downtown apartment complex (Fallview Apts). Often, only able-bodied people can get around in downtown Seymour. I and other PWDs cannot—because police do not enforce ordinances or regulations that enable accessibility. I have filed complaints on these issues against Seymour and its police department with the Connecticut Commission on Human Rights & Opportunities (1730312, 1830021). Inex-plicably, CHRO ruled that town and police policy do not discriminate against PWDs—even though only able-bodied persons can get around.

PWDs are routinely denied their rights to access and mobility at Seymour’s new $6.4 million park (Paul Pawlak Sr. Fishway & Park at Tingue Dam). Police do not ticket or tow away vehicles obstructing or blocking access to the “accessible walkway” leading to the scenic lookout.

PWDs are routinely denied their rights to access Seymour’s downtown businesses when property owners flout Seymour Ordinance 14-6, which mandates timely removal of snow from sidewalks. Seymour PD itself routinely flouts Ordinance 1-9, which mandates that flouters “shall” be fined up to $100/day for each day of the offense. Seymour PD has admitted never having fined snow ordinance flouters. Sidewalks covered with snow that should have been removed by town law prevent PWDs from access to groceries, restaurants, pharmacy, banking, worship, theater, shopping, and other reasonable purposes. For more information: DRAGconnecticut@yahoo.com, (203) 463-8323

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