Nov. 2 Book Launch, Zionist Betrayal of Jews, New Haven

News release

On Saturday, Nov. 2, Stanley Heller will talk about his new book “Zionist Betrayal of Jews: From Herzl to Netanyahu.” It’s a history of the many, many times Zionist groups and Israel put their state-building project ahead of the vital interests of Jews. The event will take place in the Community Room in the lower level of the New Haven Public Library, 133 Elm St., at 2 p.m. Free and open to the public, there will be light refreshments. Sponsored by the Middle East Crisis Committee and co-sponsored by Jewish Voice for Peace (New Haven), part of the meeting will be about their projects.

Most people know something about the disastrous effects of the Zionist movement on Palestinians and other Middle Eastern peoples, but the story of the cost of Zionism to Jews is less well known. The account ranges from Theodore Herzl, the founder of modern Zionism, making a deal with the notorious anti-Semitic Imperial Russian minister von Plehve to Israel’s current Prime Minister Netanyahu declaring friendship with authoritarians who use dog whistles of anti-Semitism to appeal to their bases. The book describes the Zionist destruction of the powerful anti-Nazi boycott of the ’30s, Israel’s friendly relations to Argentina under the rule of Jew-hating generals and Israel’s sale of weapons to modern Ukraine whose army includes a neo-Nazi Azov Brigade.

One of the reasons for writing the book was to expose the Zionists who constantly accuse critics of Israel for being anti-Semitic. Again and again a sentence is taken out of context or a political cartoon is taken to task for resembling something anti-Semitic from the ’30s. Heller’s book exposes the hypocrisy of the Zionist movement which made deals with anti-Semites and in some cases killers of Jews, deals that put Jews in peril.

This is Heller’s second book. His first was titled “The Uprising We Need” (2017), which was a collection of his articles that appeared in newspapers and media. The book is available for a donation of $10 or more to the Middle East Crisis Committee.  See ordering information about both books at stanleyheller.com.

People’s World Amistad Awards: Rise Up — Unite 2020, Nov. 8, People’s Center

by Joelle Fishman, CT People’s World

This year’s People’s World Amistad Awards will take place on Saturday, Dec. 14, at 4 p.m. at New Haven City Hall Atrium, 165 Church Street — site of the Amistad statue symbolizing solidarity and courage in the ongoing freedom struggle. The theme is “Rise Up – Unite 2020. People & Planet before Profits.”

We invite you to place an ad in the greeting book and take a bloc of tickets to honor the awardees and the occasion. The ad deadline is November 20, 2019. For greeting book and ticket information e-mail ct-pww@pobox.com or call (203) 624-4254.

This year’s awardees are:

Rochelle Palache, Political Director of 32 BJ SEIU, a fierce warrior for workers’ and immigrant rights and a leader in the fight that won $15 minimum wage and paid family leave in Connecticut.

Ken Suzuki, Secretary-Treasurer of Unite Here Local 34 and a leader in the ongoing fight for job pipelines for Black and Latino neighborhood residents to full-time union jobs at Yale University.

John Humphries, Executive Director of the CT Roundtable for Climate and Jobs, is in the forefront of the movement for a just transition for workers and people of color in the climate crisis.

The Awards event leads into the 2020 elections and is held on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the Communist Party USA. Special recognition will be given to Joelle Fishman for 50 years of leadership. To mark this special year, all former awardees will be called forward in a tribute to their continued contributions and unity building. The Movement Band and Brian Jarawa Gray and Friends will perform.

OCT. 19 Public Forum: The Fascist Threat and Effective Resistance in the Era of Donald Trump

With a formal impeachment inquiry now underway, the nation is in a constitutional crisis as Trump says he will not cooperate with the impeachment inquiry. Democracy is under threat – how did we get here? 

Two scholars will discuss the underpinnings of the fascist threat in America today.

Between The Lines Radio Newsmagazine is sponsoring a public forum with:
• Jason Stanley, Yale professor of philosophy and author of “How Fascism Works: The Politics of Us and Them”
• Christopher Vials, director of American Studies at University of Connecticut and author of “Haunted by Hitler: Liberals, the Left and the Fight Against Fascism in the United States”

SATURDAY, OCT. 19, 2019, 12:30-3:30 p.m.
Parish House of the United Church on the Green
323 Temple St., New Haven, CT

Suggested contribution $10. Includes booksigning and reception.
Seating is limited.
Tickets may be purchased at Eventbrite online or below on this page.

Questions? Please call (203) 268-8446 or email contact@btlonline.org to call for more information or advance tickets. Leave your name, phone number and number of tickets to reserve. Your name will be placed on an advance tickets list at the door. Cash or checks made out to Squeaky Wheel Productions for tickets. Doors open at 12 noon. Booksigning – cash or checks.

To purchase tickets by mail, send check payable to Squeaky Wheel Productions, P.O. Box 110176, Trumbull, CT. We will put your name on an advance tickets list.

Free parking lots on the weekends (See below for more information):
• 60 Wall Street, behind the Parish House (accessed only from Temple and Wall Street).
Note: Wall Street is one-way going east in this block.
• Lot 51 on Temple Street just before intersection of Temple and Elm Streets
Note: Temple Street is one-way going south.

Note: Street metered parking is not free on Saturdays.

Media
“How Fascism Works review: a vital read for a nation under Trump,” The Guardian (UK)
“How Fascism Works: The Politics of Us and Them,” book review by New York Journal of Books
“How Fascism Works,” Jason Stanley, Yale professor discusses his new book, “How Fascism Works — the Politics of Us and Them,” Resistance Radio, WPKN, April 19, 2019
“The Campus Antifascist Network is Winning the Fight Against Fascism at Universities,” essay co-written by Chris Vials, Los Angeles Review of Books, Feb. 10, 2018
CNN New Day interview with Jason Stanley on “propaganda” during the impeachment inquiry

Help us spread the word about this event!

Flyers 
4-up postcards
Audio PSA
Press release
Book Review

Directions:

From Interstate 91 North and South
• Take Exit 3, Trumbull Street
• As you exit on the connector and approach the first traffic light, stay in center lane, being aware of merging traffic.
• At the third traffic light (past Orange and Whitney streets), turn left onto Temple Street, a one-way street going south.
• Go past the next traffic light, Grove Street.

The Parish House of United Church on the Green is at 323 Temple St., the corner of Temple and Wall streets, which has a pedestrian crossing with yellow lights.

• To enter 60 Wall Street lot: Turn left at this intersection, which is behind the Parish House. Walk out of the parking lot and go left on Wall Street, then go left on Temple Street.

If this lot is full, go to Lot 51 on Temple street:
Exit the parking lot and go right on Wall Street.
Turn left onto Church Street, the first intersection.
At next light, turn left onto Grove Street.
Turn left onto Temple Street.

To Lot 51 on Temple Street:  Continue down the block to just before the Temple and Elm Street traffic light. The entrance is on the right side.

Tickets may be purchased below.

Top of the Rock Climate Picnic

by Chris Schweitzer, New Haven Climate Movement

Join the New Haven Climate Movement from 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 6 for a picnic at the English Shelter Pavilion located at the top of East Rock Park overlooking the City of New Haven.

This is an opportunity to celebrate New Haven’s passage of a Climate Emergency Resolution, strategize next steps, and most importantly welcome new members. We encourage those who are concerned about the climate disaster and/or want to ensure a safe climate to join our picnic. All are welcome!

Food and beverages will be provided, but feel free to bring anything you want to share. If you do bring something to share, please consider others’ dietary choices and bring either a vegetarian or vegan dish.
If you have any questions about the event, please email newhavenclimatemovement@gmail.com.

Sept. 20 Strike for the Climate

by Stanley Heller, Administrator, Promoting Enduring Peace

We are in a desperate situation, with awful climate news coming nearly every week and with just a decade or so to drastically cut exhausts of carbon in the air. At the same time, climate science deniers are at the helm in the U.S. and other major governments. City and state governments are trying, but it’s not nearly enough.

In May, millions of students took part in a school strike for the climate. Friday, Sept. 20 will hopefully be a renewal of that kind of action along with strikes and other kinds of action from other sectors in the global society.

We are learning from Puerto Rico and Hong Kong that mass mobilizations are the way to get things done. In Connecticut, the Connecticut Climate Crisis Mobilization (C3M) is organizing a week of actions starting Sept 20. There will be a demonstration in Hartford 12-3 p.m. at the Capitol Building, 210 Capitol Ave. More info at actionnetwork.org/events/ct-climate-strike. The best way to reach C3M is by email: C3Mobilization@gmail.com. Also see the site www.350ct.org.

The New Haven Climate Network is organizing an event later in the day, 3 p.m. on the New Haven Green, 250 Temple St. Look for them on Facebook (New Haven Climate Movement).

Trade unions worldwide are taking action in support of Sept. 20. See pepeace.org/climate-and-nature-work for details and the website of Connecticut Roundtable on Cli-mate and Jobs at ctclimateandjobs.org. If your union is planning anything bring it up with union officers or at a union meeting.

Visit the tables of Promoting Enduring Peace (PEP) and the Sierra Club at the CT Folk Festival/Green Expo, noon to 5 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 7 at Edgerton Park in New Haven. Entrance to the festival is free.

PEP will be talking about its bold new calls for:
1) worker/community takeovers of fossil fuel industries, and
2) planning the economy for a smokestack-free future.

Read about it at www.PEPeace.org.

Greater New Haven Labor History Association Annual Meeting 1:30-4 p.m. Sunday Sept. 15

by Steve Kass, President, GNHLHA

Please join us for our annual meeting at the New Haven Labor Center, 267 Chapel Street, New Haven. As usual, the Greater New Haven Labor History Association (GNHLHA) will present the Augusta Louis Troup “Pass It On” award to people and organizations that advance the labor movement agenda of decent working conditions at a good wage with hope for the future.

This year’s recipients are Dan Livingston and Cathy Osten. Dan is one of the most widely known and respected labor attorneys in Connecticut, a life-time member of the United Auto Workers Union, and a progressive activist. Cathy is a Democratic member of the Connecticut State Legislature representing District 19 since 2013. As the President of SEIU 2001, she successfully led efforts for Connecticut health care, paid sick leave and aligning prevailing union wage and minimum wages to annual Consumer Price Index increases.

In addition, there will be a panel discussion on the labor movement since the Janus vs. AFCSME Supreme Court decision. It will be moderated by Troy Rondinone (labor history professor at Southern CT State University) with the following participants: Teri Merisolis (AFTCT Legislative Advocate), Rick Melita (SEIU Director of CT State Council), Sal Luciano (CT AFL-CIO president), Dan Livingston and Cathy Osten.

Pizza will be served from 1:30 to 1:50 p.m., then we will start our program and awards promptly. Frank Panzarella will perform labor music.

The meeting is free and open to the public. The GNHLHA welcomes you to join the organization or renew your membership. It costs $25 or $10 for low income people each year. Our website is www.laborhistory.org.

Interfaith Peace Waged in New Haven

Volunteers from multiple interfaith organizations painted a new billboard Thursday that will tower over I-95 right northbound before Exit 45 .

The 50-foot billboard was one of numerous projects completed by over 100 volunteers from across the world who gathered for New Haven Interfaith Service Day.

The effort was led by Rev. Nicholas Porter from Jerusalem Peacebuilders and Bruce Barrett from IWagePeace.org with local clergy members Rabbi Brian Immerman (Congregation Mishkan Israel), Imam Omer Bajwa (Yale Chaplin), Father Stephen Holton (Christ Episcopal Church), and Rev. Bonita Grubbs (Christian Community Action).

Source: Interfaith Peace Waged | New Haven Independent

News from The Institute Library

On Sept. 5, The Institute Library welcomes noted local journalist Lary Bloom, author of Sol LeWitt: A Life of Ideas. Lary Bloom will be here with a special guest to discuss the life and works of Sol LeWitt, as chronicled in his recently published book (Wesleyan Univ. Press); guests will be encouraged to participate in dialogue with Bloom and his guest after a presentation by the author. Time TBD, please save the date and check back! www.institutelibrary.org.

The closing event for A Blue Dark, upstairs at the Gallery at The Institute Library, is Saturday, Sept. 7, 4-6 p.m. Fritz Horstman will be our guest, happy to sign catalogs available for sale. The Gallery has been proud to display the work of Fritz Horstman and Fiona Sze-Lorrain, a combination of visual art and poetry. Please come see the show before that day. The Gallery is open during Library hours.

From 4-6 p.m. Sept. 14, the Gallery at The Institute Library hosts the opening event for Melted Pots & Cooked Books. Gallery curator Martha Lewis, with the support of the International Association of New Haven and Friends of the Gallery at the Institute Library, has cooked up a delectable show for our Autumn 2019 exhibit. Melted Pots & Cooked Books is about international and inherited food traditions.  Ms. Lewis, a rather formidable home cook herself, is presenting the food memories and histories of those who were moved by her call. The exhibit will be on display from Sept. 14 into early winter, but the opening event (precise time TBA) should be a humdinger. In partnership with people who know their way around the art world and the kitchen, Martha Lewis has a glorious installment not just tucked up her sleeves, but hidden in the pockets of her apron. And maybe a boiled sweet for you, if you’re nice. The Institute Library, 847 Chapel St., (203) 562-4045.

PAR News

PAR PARty Was Great! On July 27, PAR held a party for our subscribers and readers and we had a wonderful time! It is all too rare that activists and organizers have the luxury to socialize with each other and hang out without an agenda and list of demands! Many thanks to all who brought delicious food and to our musicians Francis Braunlich, Frank Panzarella and Chris Zurcher. We are grateful to our readers and article-writers, and hope to have more gatherings

PAR Planning Committee invites all subscribers to PAR Party 5 p.m. Saturday, July 27

The PAR newsletter Planning Committee is inviting all our subscribers to a PAR party on Saturday, July 27. It’s potluck (note: no alcohol) from 5-9 p.m. at the Friends meeting house, 225 East Grand Ave. in the Fair Haven section of New Haven.

We look forward especially to have our print subscribers meet our internet subscribers so we can share issues of concern, network, make new friends, have fun and socialize over dinner.

Feel free to invite others. Musicians are welcome to bring instruments to jam.

It would be helpful if you RSVP at parnewhaven@hotmail.com.

Hope to see you there!

PAR does not charge for a digital subscription. Donations are always welcome to help us cover our costs.

If your printed subscription expired, you can resubscribe at the party, or send $13 {or what you can afford) to:

PAR
P.O. Box 995
New Haven, CT 06504

parnewhaven@hotmail.com
par-newhaven.org

PAR Party 5-9 p.m. Saturday July 27 Friends Meeting House, Fair Haven

To PAR Subscribers:

The PAR newsletter Planning Committee is inviting all our subscribers to a PAR party on Saturday, July 27. It’s potluck (note: no alcohol) from 5-9 p.m. at the Friends meeting house, 225 East Grand Ave. in the Fair Haven section of New Haven.

We look forward especially to have our print subscribers meet our internet subscribers so we can share issues of concern, network, make new friends, have fun and socialize over dinner.

Feel free to invite others. Musicians are welcome to bring instruments to jam.

It would be helpful if you RSVP at parnewhaven@hotmail.com.

Hope to see you there!

PAR does not charge for a digital subscription. Donations are always welcome to help us cover our costs.
PAR
P.O. Box 995
New Haven, CT 06504

parnewhaven@hotmail.com
par-newhaven.org

Remembering Anne Frank: Film Showing of Redemption Blues June 12 @ NH Free Public Library

In commemoration of Anne Frank’s 90th birthday, please join us for a screening of “Redemption Blues,” directed by Peter Stastny  (2017; 84 min., English & German/English subtitles) Wednesday, June 12, 5:30 to 8 p.m., New Haven Free Public Library, 133 Elm Street.

A lifetime after the Shoah: Forgetting is not an option and memory only goes so far. When prayers are not enough, music can keep us going. It is not too late to mourn and not too soon to replenish.

“Redemption Blues” is a film about the thorny legacy of the Holocaust generation and the insights of some of its last survivors. The film begins where conventional Shoah narratives leave off and traces a path forward, through personal and emotional engagement towards hope.

Director and producer Peter Stastny was born in Vienna as the son of Orthodox Jewish refugees. After a career in psychiatry, he began working with film in the mid-1990s, looking for ways to move forward after the immense trauma endured by the Jewish population of Europe during the Second World War.

Discussion with Peter Stastny will follow the screening. Co-sponsors are: The International Association of New Haven and The City of New Haven Peace Commission. For more information, contact Seth, sgodfrey@nhfpl.org, or (203) 946-7450. New Haven Free Public Library, 133 Elm St.

Report on Coalition for People Annual Meeting

On April 17, the Coalition for People held its first annual meeting since 2014. Among the 24 attendees, there were many past members and some newcomers to the group.

The gathering started off with music by Flint Ladder. A slideshow featuring CFP founder Mary Johnson played during the performance.

Elected board members are Dorothy Johnson, Elizabeth Neuse, Holly Hackett and JoAnn Moran. If anyone wants to still join the board, they can be considered during the monthly business meetings. Please call (203) 468-2541 if you are interested in joining the board.

The keynote speaker was Rev. Bonita Grubbs, Director of Christian Community Action. She spoke about the long history of Coalition for People, the legacy of Mary Johnson, what it means to be organizing and inspiring people, and always pushing for what is right, even though it may not always be immediately evident. She gave the example that that week scientists were able to photograph a black hole, proving Albert Einstein’s theory about the existence of black holes, 64 years after Einstein’s death. Many ridiculed Einstein when he first presented that theory, just as many people call activists crazy for trying to change things. But just because we as activists don’t get immediate results doesn’t mean we’re crazy or wrong. Rev. Grubbs talked about the individual lights of each person, their intelligence, skills, how people have their own understanding, that everyone can bring their lights together, discuss reality and solutions from her or his own perspective, and shine the light to push things forward.

Discussion of various topics followed – affordable housing, Yale New Haven Hospital’s plan to move the primary care centers to Long Wharf, healthcare, homelessness, justice. It was a good gathering to share the concerns of Coalition members and supporters, as well as those new to CFP.

The monthly board meetings are open to the membership. For June, July and August, our meetings are on the third Wednesday from 3-5 p.m. at the Fair Haven Library, 182 Grand Avenue (June 19, July 17, and August 21). For more information, email coalitionforpeople@hotmail.com. Thank you!

Make Music Day Connecticut Returns on June 21

Connecticut Office of the Arts

For the second year, cities and towns across Connecticut will join forces to present over 500 free outdoor musical events on Friday, June 21 for Make Music Day, a global music celebration on the summer solstice each year that brings people of all ages and skill levels together to make music. For information, see www.makemusicnewhaven.org.

Last year, Make Music Day made its Connecticut debut, with an impressive 528 free musical performances at 224 locations across the state, coordinated by twelve regional chapters brought together by the Connecticut Office of the Arts. This year, eighteen chapters have formed to organize Make Music Connecticut, the most of any state, joining more than 80 other U.S. cities hosting thousands of Make Music performances across the country as part of the world’s largest annual music event.

New Haven Documentary Film Festival May 30-June 9

The 6th annual New Haven Documentary Film Festival runs from May 30-June 9. The 11-day fest will feature over 100 films and other special events in various venues. All film screenings and workshops are free. For the full schedule, see nhdocs.com.

Michael Moore Retrospective will be at the New Haven Documentary Film Festival Friday, June 7 – Sunday, June 9 at the Whitney Humanities Center Auditorium at Yale, 53 Wall St., New Haven. The Festival will feature free showings of seven of Michael Moore’s films. The audience can discuss the films with Michael Moore and filmmakers D.A. Pennebaker, Chris Hegedus and Peter Davis.

Free and open to the public.

PAR PARTY – July 27

Come have fun! Meet the crew and the organizers who make the PAR newsletter happen! This is an invitation to all PAR readers to come to our PARty on Saturday, July 27, from 5-9 p.m. at the Friends Meeting House, 225 East Grand Ave. Let people know what projects you’re involved with. Meet old friends and make new ones! Bring a dish to share for the potluck. Musicians, please bring instruments for jamming.

Take advantage of this chance to have fun and meet other subscribers that share your interest in social justice, environmental concerns and activism. We’d love to have our print and online subscribers get together! Please RSVP to parnewhaven@hotmail.com.

The Progressive Action Roundtable newsletter publishes from September through June. Subscriptions from many of our readers will expire with this issue. We hope you enjoy your subscription and value the PAR newsletter as a community resource. To see if your subscription is due for renewal, please look at your address label. If “201906” is printed on the label to the right of your name, your subscription ends with this issue. Please send in $13 (or what you can afford) for 10 issues (Sept. 2019-June 2020) so that you can continue to read about what local organizations are doing and you can submit articles about your own organization. We hope to hear from you soon.

The Progressive Action Roundtable was started in January 1993. After several months, this community Newsletter became the main activity of PAR, giving New Haven area organizations an opportunity for networking and for advertising their activities.

Happy May Day! Continue the Struggle for Justice!

by the PAR Planning Committee

Since the nationwide strike for the 8-hour workday in 1886, the first of May has become a historic day for the struggles of working people, and for over a hundred years May 1 has been celebrated as International Workers’ Day. Locally, in 1970, the May Day protests on the New Haven Green demanded freedom for Bobby Seale, justice for the Black Panthers, and the end of the Vietnam War. Starting in 1987 and continuing for thirty years on the Green, the annual May Day celebration each year brought together dozens of organizations to promote their work for labor rights, peace, human rights, and economic rights to the broader New Haven community. And since 2006, city-wide marches for immigrants’ rights are held on May 1. Peace, racism, police brutality, union struggles, fair wages, anti-war, immigration, a safe environment, criminal justice issues, labor history, welfare rights organizing, the right to healthcare — these are some of the struggles and issues in the celebration of international solidarity.

April was a month full of upsurge. From April 11-21, Stop & Shop workers from Connecticut, Rhode Island and

Massachusetts (31,000 workers) were on strike. The union considers the new contract a victory, preserving healthcare and retirement benefits and providing wage increases. The next strike in Connecticut will be unionized workers in nursing homes. They are scheduled to strike on May 1.

For days there have been massive protests and marches in New Haven and Hamden condemning the thoroughly unjustified Hamden and Yale police shooting in New Haven of two African-Americans in their early twenties on April 16. Thankfully, Stephanie Washington is recovering from her bullet wounds, and Paul Witherspoon was not hit. Video from the police body cameras has not yet been released. As of this writing, people will gather at 7 p.m. on Monday, May 6 at the Hamden Town Hall for the Legislative Council Meeting. We urge our readers to join in the many rallies for justice around these and other issues and be inspired by the many people at the forefront of these struggles for their lives and their livelihoods.

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