Say NO! to Spectra Energy’s Fracked-Gas Pipeline Expansion

by Dan Fischer, Capitalism vs. the Climate

vic-lancia-spectraNorth Windham, CT —  In celebration of his 75th birthday today, Middletown resident Vic Lancia locked himself to two giant “birthday cakes” — actually concrete-filled barrels decorated with candles and frosting — on the sole road leading up to a site where Spectra Energy stores construction equipment and materials for use across Connecticut. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission reports posted at capitalismvsclimate.org confirm what local residents have seen: Spectra trucks regularly using the facility to expand fracking infrastructure.

By blocking Spectra workers from accessing the site, Vic aimed to disrupt Spectra’s ongoing construction of its “AIM Project,” a billion-dollar fracked-gas pipeline expansion affecting communities across the state.

“It’s simple,” Vic explained. “Capitalism and the burning of fossil fuels are destroying our beloved and beautiful planet, the habitat for all humanity and life, all for profit and convenience. Isn’t it time to resist? Do we not care for our children, the generations beyond our lives, and for life itself?”

After blocking the entrance to the site for over two hours, Vic negotiated with the police and unlocked. Vic wasn’t arrested, and he got to keep the concrete “birthday cakes.”

Vic is a member of Capitalism vs. the Climate, a horizontally-organized, Connecticut-based group that takes direct action against the root causes of the climate crisis. About ten other members and supporters joined Vic, sharing chocolate cake and waving balloons. Beneath the festivities, however, they expressed outrage at Spectra’s pipeline expansion.

“Spectra’s pipeline expansion is catastrophic in many ways. It creates incentives for fracking in the shale fields. It transports highly flammable gas just one-hundred feet from a nuclear power plant in New York, potentially endangering tens of millions of people. It accelerates global warming, since fracked gas has an even higher impact on the climate than coal does,” said Willimantic resident Roger Benham.

Please share the Facebook meme: //on.fb.me/1WGLJFV

Donate to cover “cake” ingredient costs: bit.ly/CVC-Action

Photos at capitalismvsclimate.org.

After the People’s Climate March: What’s Next for Connecticut Activists?

Sunday, January 18, 2015, at 2 pm there will be a panel followed by a discussion period. We want to hear from YOU! Rescheduled from December!

Presenters:
Jeremy Brecher, Labor Network for Sustainability
Terri Eickel, Interreligious Eco-Justice Network
Camilla Ibanez, Deep Roots United Front/Occupy Sandy
Jen Siskind, Food & Water Watch
Elaine Ward, CT Coalition for Environmental Justice
Diane Lentakis, 350.org CT and Sierra Club
Dan Fischer, Capitalism v. Climate

Connecticut sent over a thousand marchers to NYC in September and many of us are wondering what next? Before it’s too late we must prepare to face:

  • a polluting coal fired plant;
  • the push for more fracked gas pipelines;
  • the continuing danger of nuclear power; and
  • the massive struggle to convert to 100% renewable
    energy?

Come hear climate justice leaders and voice your own vision of the kind of the movement we need to build. Sunday, January 18, 2015, 2 p.m. in “Semesters“ hall, Student Center, Central Connecticut State University, New Britain (http://web.ccsu.edu/campusmap/.)

For more info: Chris, (860) 478-5300.
Sponsored by 350CT.org

Rising Tide Member Found Not Guilty for May 27 Vermont Gas Protest

by Sara Sullivan, Rising Tide Vermont, Nov. 20

The trial of Henry Harris, charged with trespassing at Vermont Gas Systems’ (VGS) headquarters in South Burlington on May 27, ended today with a not guilty verdict. Harris and other members of Rising Tide Vermont blockaded the main entrance of VGS and dropped a massive banner from the roof, demanding the company immediately cancel its plans to build the fracked gas pipeline.

Harris, a volunteer organizer with Rising Tide Vermont, said, “Today, the court ruled in my favor because the jury recognized Vermont Gas and the state of Vermont had no basis in their charges against me. The state’s prosecutor, with pressure from VGS and the Shumlin administration, was attempting to stifle future protests against the fracked gas pipeline and Shumlin’s hypocritical climate and energy policies.”

Since the May 27 protest, hundreds of Vermonters have taken part in rallies, blockades, and an occupation of the Governor’s office to demand an end to the pipeline project. The 64 activists who were arrested at the occupation on Oct. 27 are also facing charges of trespass. “We asked the Governor to revoke his support of the fracked gas pipeline,” said Stuart Blood, 63, an organizer with Keystone XL Resistance from Thetford Center, “and to recognize the need to ban all new fossil fuel infrastructure, because new fossil fuels move us in the wrong direction.”

Read the article at: http://vtdigger.org/2014/11/20/rising-tide-member-found-guilty-may-27-vermont-gas-protest.

Exciting Sustainability Workshops Nov. 1 and Nov. 2, New Haven

by Maria Tupper, the New Haven Bioregional Group

On Nov. 1 and 2 the Bioregional Group, New Haven Land Trust, Food Policy Council, Common Ground, New Haven Farms and other groups from the New Haven community are co-sponsoring workshops by Jonathan Bates, Permaculturist. We are able to offer the event for free because of a grant we received from the New Haven Green Fund.

On Nov. 1, we will be at Barnard School, 170 Derby Avenue, 7- 9 p.m. and Nov. 2 at New Haven Friends Meeting House, 223 East Grand Avenue, 4:30 – 6:30 p.m. People can attend one or both events.

Jonathan Bates

Jonathan Bates

In “Edible Forest Gardening: Living Sustainably in the City,” Jonathan Bates, owner of Food Forest Farm and contributing author of “Paradise Lot: Two Plant Geeks, One-Tenth of an Acre, and the Making of an Edible Garden Oasis in the City,” will show you how he transformed a blighted urban yard into an edible paradise. By using permaculture design he’s created both beauty and abundance, meeting human needs while improving ecosystem health.

Read more

“People and Nature before Profits” — People’s World Amistad Awards Dec. 7

by Joelle Fishman, CT People’s World

This year’s Amistad Awards will be presented by the People’s World on Sunday, Dec. 7 at 4 p.m. at a “People & Nature Before Profits” anniversary rally in New Haven at Cooperative Arts and Humanities High School, 177 College St. (entrance corner of College and Crown).

Rising inequalities, climate change and war are giving rise to new organizing by youth, low-wage workers and the 99% for a society that values the needs of people and nature before corporate profits.

The event will celebrate the contributions of Meg Riccio, Alberto Bernandez and Daniel Durant, three leaders and role models who challenge economic and racial inequality and who are in the forefront to get out the vote for jobs, health care, union rights, immigrant rights and the needs of youth.

Read more

Join Our CT EcoStocking

by JoAnn Moran, Handy Humans

eco-stockingThe EcoStocking is a holiday stocking celebration of Connecticut businesses, farmers and artisans. The EcoStocking is a unique way to say you are proud to support those who live and do business in Connecticut while advocating for a healthy environment and local economy.

We are working with Connecticut businesses to fill 1,000 stockings! Participating business contribute 1000 items for inclusion in the stocking and its promotional campaign. Stockings will be available for order by and for CT residents beginning Nov. 1 at www.ecostocking.com and delivered USPS Dec. 15-18, 2014.

Read more

Help Us Close the Last Coal Burning Plant in the State‏

by Stanley Heller, Bridgeport Act on Climate

On Monday, Oct. 6 bring signs to our press conference in Bridgeport City Hall just before a vote by the City Council on a resolution calling for the closing of the coal burning power plant in Bridgeport. The plant is a double menace. It excretes mercury, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide and microscopic toxic particulate matter into the local community of the South End, which is mostly low income and minority. Several years ago the NAACP reported that the plant was the tenth worst in the U.S. in terms of climate justice.

It also endangers the whole world by pouring 146,000 tons of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere each year. We’re on a path to climate catastrophe if we don’t stop those gases from warming the world much more than it already has. Read more

People’s Climate March demonstrates a ‘more radical climate justice movement’

Dan Fischer, Capitalism vs Climate

In the weekend before the UN’s climate change summit in New York, some 400,000 people flooded the city for the Sept 21st People’s Climate March. It was the largest environmental march in history. Yes, the Big Green nonprofits made sure the official demands were toothless and the corporate media heaped unnecessary praise on the participating senators Sheldon Whitehouse and Bernie Sanders, champions of fracking and biomass respectively. On the ground, however, things were more exciting. The huge Palestine solidarity contingent led chants like “Apartheid, can’t greenwash that!” Wobblies, Earth Firsters and Rising Tiders injected their messages. Members of many communities brought banners from the frontlines against fracking, mega-dams, and incineration. Ours said, “Smash cap-and-trade,” referring to the 1%’s attempt to auction off the sky and maintain business as usual. Read more

Joyous Giant Climate March Shows How To Win

by Harvey Wasserman, The Rag Blog, September 22, 2014

NEW YORK — The massive People’s Climate March, the most hopeful, diverse, photogenic, energizing, and often hilarious march I’ve joined in 52 years of activism — and one of the biggest, at 400,000 strong — has delivered a simple message: we can and will rid the planet of fossil fuels and nuclear power, we will do it at the grassroots, it will be demanding and difficult to say the least, but it will also have its moments of great fun. With our lives and planet on the line, our species has responded.

Ostensibly, this march was in part meant to influence policy makers. That just goes with the territory. But in fact what it showed was an amazingly broad-based, diverse, savvy, imaginative, and very often off-beat movement with a deep devotion to persistence and cause and a great flair for fun.

The magic of today’s New York minute was its upbeat diversity, sheer brilliance and relentless charm. A cross between a political rally and a month at Mardi Gras. There were floats, synchronized dances, outrageous slogans, chants, songs, costumes, marching bands, hugs, parents with their kids and one very sweaty guy in a gorilla suit. Above all, there was joy…which means optimism…which means we believe we can win…which is the best indicator we will. Read more

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