Latin American Film Festival Nov. 9-13

by Jane Mills, LIFFY

Latino & Iberian Film Festival at Yale or LIFFY is coming up November 9 – 13 and is free and open to the public.

The schedule is shaping up. Opening and closing night films will be shown at Luce Hall Auditorium, 34 Hillhouse Avenue. These films are described below.

All films will have English subtitles; filmmakers and actors will be in attendance for many of the films. Some evenings will feature receptions.

Opening night Wednesday, Nov. 9, at 7 p.m. features Pinches actores (Freakin’ Actors) Mexico, France (2015, 119 min.) Director: Hermanos Dufour. Comedy, Drama. Q&A with actress Grecia Monroc. Six friends overcome a series of adversities and challenges as actors. One dreams of being a soap opera star; another puts up with a jealous wife and less than promising roles; a young actress believes in the power of acting as an art form but has to deal with the industry’s sexism; a leading man doesn’t care who he has to step on to get to the top; and a family man’s acting dreams begin to slip away. Finally there’s the eccentric Mad who shares these stories and his own in this love letter to acting.

Closing night Sunday, November 13, at 8 p.m. features La Gunguna (The Gunguna) Dominican Republic (2015, 87 min.) Director: Ernesto Alemany. Dark Comedy. Q&A with Ernesto Alemany (Director). The Gunguna is a tiny .22 caliber pistol that once belonged to General Trujillo and had enormous sentimental value for the dictator. It is sought out by collectors worldwide who are willing to pay a pretty penny for it. Some are even willing to kill for it. The gun will fall in the hands of a construction worker in desperate straits, a corrupt border patrol sergeant, a merciless loan shark, a local Chinese mobster, an arms dealer and a sleazy bar owner.

For more information, contact: Margherita Tortora, Founder and Director, margherita.tortora@yale.edu or Jane Mills, (203) 278-3723.

A complete schedule will be online at http://liffy.yale.edu or http://www.facebook.com/liffyyale. Times and locations of films vary throughout the festival.

PACE to Honor Judi Friedman at Annual Meeting Nov. 12

by Mark Scully, chairperson, PACE

People’s Action for Clean Energy (PACE) will honor the legacy of long-time chairperson Judi Friedman and her husband Lou at the organization’s annual meeting at 7 p.m. on Nov. 12 at the Unitarian Society of Hartford, 50 Bloomfield Ave. in Hartford.

friedman-judi-louJudi Friedman led PACE for forty-three years and was a strong, impassioned voice in support of clean energy and against nuclear power and weapons. Judi, her supportive husband Lou and the PACE team whom they gathered and inspired have been tireless promoters of clean energy through house tours, public testimony and local radio and television programs. PACE looks forward to honoring Judi at the annual meeting with a film tribute on her legacy.

PACE will continue to live out its mission by presenting awards on Nov. 12 to the Governor’s Council on Climate Change (GC3) as well as to Lynn Stoddard, Director of the Institute for Sustainable Energy at Eastern Connecticut State University. The evening’s keynote address will be given by Ms. Stoddard about the GC3 and its strategies to meet the state’s aggressive targets to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Mark Scully, PACE’s new chairman and leader in municipal efforts to achieve 100% renewable energy, will present on the future direction of the organization. The evening will close with a musical tribute by the acclaimed musician Paul Winter.

PACE is a public health and environmental organization formed in 1973 by a group of concerned Connecticut citizens to:

  • Promote the development of alternative, renewable sources of energy,
  • Encourage the efficient use of energy,
  • Develop a spirit of conservation among Connecticut residents, and
  • Challenge Connecticut’s commitment to nuclear power and nuclear weapons.

Through its house tours, publications, radiation monitoring and recognition of environmental leaders, PACE has educated countless members of the public on energy issues. PACE is the largest all-volunteer organization in the state to be engaged with these issues, and its members are active at public events, legislative hearings and environmental forums, both in person and on state and local television and radio. PACE is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization. For further information on PACE and to reserve a free ticket to the annual meeting, go to http://www.pace-cleanenergy.org.

People’s World Amistad Awards 2016, Dec. 4: “If There Is No Struggle, There Can Be No Progress”

by Joelle Fishman, People’s World

This year’s People’s World Amistad Awards are dedicated to carrying on the torch of Arthur L. Perry, a great friend, union leader, and warrior for justice who received the People’s World Amistad Award in 2009.

The event is Sunday, December 4, 2016 at 4 p.m. at Wexler Grant Community School, 55 Foote St., New Haven, on the theme “If there is no struggle, there can be no progress — We march united for Racial Justice, Jobs & Peace.”

Awardees Alder Jeanette Morrison, Dan Livingston and Juan Brito are outstanding leaders who have devoted their lives to the fight for economic and social justice for all.

A cultural program will highlight the event.

Alder Jeanette Morrison was elected to represent Ward 22 in New Haven as part of a labor-community coalition. She led the successful movement to rebuild the Dixwell Q House, a youth center in the heart of the African-American community next to Wexler Grant school.  As a social worker she fights to bring families together and for opportunities for children. She is a member of AFSCME.

Dan Livingston is a groundbreaking labor attorney and life-long union and progressive activist. As a member of a firm of “trouble making lawyers” (Livingston, Adler, Pulda, Meiklejohn and Kelly), he represents many public and private sector unions. He represents, works with, and serves on the boards of many coalitions, community and progressive organizations fighting for social justice in our state.

Juan Brito is a School Social Worker at Burns Latino Academy in Hartford and a member of the Hartford Feder-ation of Teachers. He is a writer for La Voz Hispana de Connecticut and a musician who has been performing with his wife Rebecca Delgado since 1977. He has published two books of poetry about his country and his experiences before, during and after the coup d’etat that affected Chile in 1973.

The awards are presented to allies by the People’s World on the occasion of the 97th anniversary of the Communist Party USA.

Tickets are $10. Adbook deadline is Nov. 18, 2016.  Information: ct-pww@pobox.com.

Changes at the Labor History Association

by Joan Cavanagh, Archivist/Director, GNH Labor History Assoc.

2016 is a year of transition for the Greater New Haven Labor History Association. As of Dec. 31, I will be leaving my position as Archivist/ Director because there is no further funding available to maintain it. LHA will return to its roots as an all-volunteer organization, guided by the efforts of its Executive Board and membership.

To prepare for this change, I am spending this fall organizing our archival holdings (including the historical records of LHA) for transfer to Archives and Special Collections at the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center at UConn in Storrs. They are establishing a Greater New Haven Labor History Association Collection. The materials we have already gathered will thus be preserved in a climate controlled facility and made available to researchers by UConn’s archivists. We encourage individuals, union locals and other relevant organizations to donate their papers, memorabilia and historical documents to the Collection. Contact Laura Katz Smith at laura.katz.smith@uconn.edu or (860) 486-2516 for information about it.

On a personal note: it has been my privilege and joy to work with the Board and the members of the Labor History Association for the past 16 years. We brought LHA into the 21st century along with its mission to collect, preserve, share and celebrate the history, culture and traditions of working people and their unions in our community and beyond.

Moving forward, LHA will help to ensure that current and future generations understand the heritage and struggles of workers through the creation of a labor history curriculum for Connecticut’s public schools as well as by carrying out other projects spearheaded by the Board and our membership. Please, get involved. If you haven’t yet become a member, please do. If you’re already a member, please consider joining the Board or a project committee. And, if you have a special project you’ve always wanted to see the organization undertake, now’s the time! Remember: We Are All Workers! (P.S. Check out the LHA exhibit on Winchester workers, now showing at Hagaman Memorial Library, East Haven until Nov. 15, and on line at http://exhibits.winchesterworkers.gnhlha.org.)

For a picture of Joan Cavanagh, director of the Greater New Haven Labor History Association, with Craig Gauthier, former president of Local 609 of the International Association of Machinists, visit the link below. They are holding one of the panels of an exhibit on Olin-Winchester labor history, outside Wells Fargo Bank in New Haven visit the link below

: Randall Beach: Winchester exhibit evokes New Haven era of union, community solidarity

Social Justice Week and Native American Issues at SCSU Nov. 15

by Isabel L Skarzynski, Grad. Asst., Women’s Studies Program

Southern Connecticut State University’s Women’s Studies Program will be hosting a Social Justice Week event, “NDN Country and Indigenous Issues Today: Why They Matter to You,” about issues facing NDN (Native American) and Indigenous peoples today in the United States and the world.

Modeled after a mini Powwow, the event includes speaking, singing, dancing, drumming and informational exhibition booths. Topics include #NoDAPL (No Dakota Access Pipeline), cultural appropriation, native language preservation, Two-Spirit traditions and Indigenous earth mysticism.
Please join us on Nov. 15, from 5-7:30 p.m., on the campus of Southern Connecticut State University in the Adanti Student Center, Room 301, for an evening of learning and celebration for social justice.

Don’t miss the opportunity to hear from NDN and indigenous presenters and their allies from Connecticut.

For more information, please contact the Women’s Studies program at SCSU (203) 392-6133 or email Womensstudies@southernct.edu. 501 Crescent St., New Haven, CT 06515.

Listen Here! Short Story Reading Series

by Bennett Graff, New Haven Review

The Institute Library is proud to host the Listen Here! Short Story Reading Series. Join us for a night of classic short stories selected by the New Haven Review staff and read by the New Haven Theater Company cast members. Reading starts at 7 p.m., with a talk back at 8 p.m. exploring the stories’ background, meaning and dramatic interpretation. Also, freshly baked cookies and tea are available.

Free! Join us every third Tuesday of the month at the Institute Library, 847 Chapel St.

The next reading will be Nov. 15.

Our theme: “Recreation.”

Our stories: “Nobody in Hollywood” by Richard Bausch and “Hershel” by Judy Budnitz.

Please note the Institute Library is one flight up and not wheelchair accessible. For more information: http://www.institutelibrary.org.

What is New Haven Review?

by Bennett Graff, New Haven Review

It is New Haven’s own literary journal, founded in August 2007 to draw attention to the writing scene in the greater New Haven area. In its role as the literary heart of the Elm City, New Haven Review publishes essays, fiction, and poetry in print and on the web twice a year. Individual issues feature work from both local and national writers, placing them in dialogue. New Haven Review is also a program of the Institute Library.

But New Haven Review is so much more!

Its editors and contributors blog for its website about the arts and literature.

It features, hands down, the best theater reviewing in all of New Haven—covering nearly every play production from Long Wharf to Yale Rep to New Haven Theater Company to smaller independent productions.

It hosts author talks at The Institute Library by local writers.

It collaborates with New Haven Theater Company in the presentation of the Listen Here! Short Story Reading series the 3rd Tuesday night of each month.

It commonly throws for its subscribers the best winter party in town at the Institute Library.
Want to know more?  Find us at http://newhavenreview.com and subscribe!

New Haven stands with Standing Rock outside Wells Fargo Bank

Thirty-five people protested outside of Wells Fargo Bank across from the New Haven Green on Oct. 20 because of the bank’s support of the Dakota Access pipeline.

Melinda Tuhus, organizer of New Haven Stands with Standing Rock, reports: ” …we shut down the bank for the last 10 minutes of the day… We got 25 more names for future work and handed out 100 flyers. We sang and chanted for quite awhile and local activist Norman Clement (Penobscot) spoke about his visit last month to Standing Rock. Afterward some of us discussed potential future actions, most likely around Thanksgiving.”

From the flyer at the protest:

Wells Fargo is a major investor in the Dakota Access pipeline, being built by Energy Transfer Partners at the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux reservation and on their historic territory in North Dakota. The tribe is leading a global campaign to stop the pipeline, which threatens their water source – the Missouri River – and that of millions of people downstream.

Wells Fargo is contributing $467 million to the $3.8 billion globally funded project; the bank needs to cut off its financial support for this pipeline. If you are a Wells Fargo customer, please ask the bank to pull its funding for the pipeline. You can back up your request by moving your money to a local bank or a credit union.

Thousands of indigenous “protectors” are putting their bodies on the line to stop the destructive fracked oil pipeline. Its 1,100-mile path would move 500,000 barrels a day of heavy oil across four states from North Dakota to Illinois, not only threatening the water but also – through its massive carbon emissions – contributing to the over-heating of the planet beyond its capacity to maintain life as we know it.

While the issue is tied up in court, construction continues, and the protectors are facing increasing arrests and more repressive police action in response to their militant but non-violent stance. They say this pipeline cannot and will not go forward, and we stand with them.

For more information go to http://www.nodaplsolidarity.org, or contact New Haven Stands with Standing Rock nhswsr@gmail.com.

Celebration of the UN International Day of Peace

This Ginkgo tree is a gift to New Haven from Japan.

Jim Pandaru hold the umbrella for New Haven Peace Commission representative Al Marder. (photo: Aaron Goode)

Jim Pandaru hold the umbrella for New Haven Peace Commission representative Al Marder. (photo: Aaron Goode)

It is a sapling survivor of the U.S. atomic bombing of Hiroshima, August 6, 1945, and was planted in the United Nations Peace Garden (Ella Grasso Boulevard and Legion Avenue) on Sept. 18 at the opening of the International Day of Peace celebration in the West River neighborhood.

Neighbors at the ceremony. (photo: Aaron Goode)

Neighbors at the ceremony. (photo: Aaron Goode)

 

Register now for CABHN’s annual Legislative Forum Nov. 18

“The CT State Budget: What is it? What can you do about it?” Friday, Nov. 18, from 9 a.m.-noon Legislative Office Building, 300 Capitol Ave., Room 2E, Hartford.

To register, go to http://www.cabhn.org/upcoming-events.

CABHN (CT Alliance for Basic Human Needs) invites you to its FREE annual Legislative Education Forum. Join Sen. Beth Bye, Rep. Toni Walker, legislative staff, advocates, and lobbyists to learn how the budget process works, when in the process one can have an impact, and the current state of CT’s budget. CABHN’s Legislative Education Series fills up fast so reserve your spot today!

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