Extended Hours for the Neighborhood Libraries

by Ashley Sklar, NHFPL

New Haven Free Public Library announces new hours at the four neighborhood libraries – open one more day each week! City Librarian, Martha Brogan, is pleased to announce the four neighborhood libraries will be open an additional day per week (12-6 p.m.) thanks to the Mayor, Board of Alders, and community advocates who made this possible. ALL library branches are CLOSED Sundays.

Fair Haven Library, 182 Grand Ave., (203) 946-8115 Mon 10-6 | Tue 10-6 | Wed 12-6 | Thu 12-8 | Fri CLOSED | Sat 10-5

Mitchell Library, 37 Harrison St. | (203) 946-8117 Mon 12-8 | Tue 12-6 | Wed 10-6 | Thu 10-6 | Fri CLOSED | Sat 10-5

Stetson Library, 200 Dixwell Ave., (203) 946-8119 Mon 10-6 | Tue 10-6 | Wed 12-8 | Thu 12-6 | Fri CLOSED | Sat 10-5

Wilson Library, 303 Washington Ave., (203) 946-2228 Mon 12-6 | Tue 12-8 | Wed 10-6 | Thu 10-6 | Fri CLOSED | Sat 10-5

Ives Main Library, 133 Elm St., (203) 946-8130 Mon 10-8 | Tue 10-8 | Wed 10-8 | Thu 10-8 | Fri 10-5 | Sat 10-5

The New Haven Free Public Library welcomes more than 620,000 library patrons through its doors each year. The library system includes the Ives Memorial Library on the historic New Haven Green, the 24/7 online services of our digital branch, the ReadMobile – bringing books to early childhood learning centers, and four neighborhood libraries: Fair Haven, Mitchell, Wilson and Stetson.

The New Haven Free Public Library’s mission is to ensure all New Haven’s citizens have full and unlimited access to information and knowledge so that they may meet the needs of daily living, have opportunities for self-education, and participate successfully in self-government.

For question or more information, please call Ashley Sklar (203) 946-8835 or e-mail asklar@nhfpl.org.

SEPTEMBER 11, 2016: Flyer Distributed at New Haven Sunday Vigil to Resist This Endless War

Our grief was never a cry for war.

why-warIn the aftermath of the September 11th, 2001 attacks on the Pentagon and the World Trade Center, “September 11th Families for Peaceful Tomorrows” and many, many other Americans proclaimed, “Our grief is not a cry for war.” People from all countries, knowing intimately and from long experience the unbearable price of war and terrorism, stood with us in word and deed. For a moment, our shared humanity and grief knew no boundaries.

But more wars were already planned.

The Bush administration used the tragedy as a pretext for the invasion of Afghanistan in October 2001 and to launch the second U.S. war on Iraq in 2003, thus beginning the 21st century by escalating and deepening the state of endless war initiated in the 20th. The lies and distortions used to justify these invasions were reported by the mainstream media, our so-called “Free Press,” as if they were unquestionable fact.

Only the rest of the world seems to have known that they were lies.

The new administration escalated the Endless War agenda it inherited. The Obama administration not only continued but escalated Endless War, making drone warfare—war by remote control—and targeted assassinations key instruments of U.S. “foreign policy.” The collateral damage—aka innocent lives lost—from these attacks is never discussed. Also not discussed is the true reason for this state of endless war: to make the world ever more abundant for the 1% of its population which already controls the vast majority of our planet’s wealth and resources.

In 2016 we have a presidential election in which the issues of war and peace are not even addressed.

The state of endless war is apparently accepted as the norm. The two leading candidates for the presidency of the United States (both members of the wealthiest 1%) simply vie to prove which one of them will be the most effective (or ruthless) in carrying it out.
Is continuing the bloodshed to enrich the 1% the way to honor all who have died as a result of the endless, senseless wars?
We think not.
Can we do better in their memory, and for our future?
We hope so.

Our grief is a cry for peace and for justice.

Labor History & Related Films Available at Best Video

from the GNH Labor History Association Newsletter, Sep-Oct 2016

Best Video Film and Cultural Center and the GNH Labor History Association have worked together to make labor history films available to educators and the general public in a convenient way. The films, located next to the political documentaries shelf, are available for a small fee at the store at 1842 Whitney Ave., Hamden.

The two small non-profit organizations hope to expand the collection through grants and donations.

Let us know if you can help!

The films include:

  • The Organizer (Italian film with Marcello Mastroianni as an itinerant labor organizer)
  • The Take (Naomi Klein documentary on workers taking over Argentinian factories)
  • The Wobblies (documentary on the International Workers of the World (IWW))
  • Norma Rae (Sally Field as a woman who gets involved in organizing in a textile factory)
  • Matewan (John Sayles movie about a 1920s coal strike)
  • Bread and Roses (Drama starring Adrian Brody about Justice for Janitors campaign in LA)
  • The Molly Maguires (Sean Connery in a drama about Irish-American secret society fighting for justice in the coal mines circa late 19th century)
  • Newsies (musical about striking newsboys)
  • American Dream (documentary about the Hormel strike)
  • Harlan County USA (Oscar-winning drama about violent 1973 coal miners strike in Kentucky)
  • F.I.S.T. (1978 drama starring Sylvester Stallone loosely based on Jimmy Hoffa’s career)
  • Hoffa (Jack Nicholson stars as Teamster leader Jimmy Hoffa)
  • The Devil and Miss Jones (1941 screwball comedy about a tycoon who goes underground to foil a union organizing campaign in his store)

    Hank Hoffman from Best Video was instrumental in supporting this collaborative project.

Listen Here! Short Story Reading Series at the Institute Library.

by Bennett Graff, New Haven Review

Join us for a night of classic short stories selected by the staff of the New Haven Review and read by cast members of the New Haven Theater Co.  Reading starts at 7 p.m., with a talk back at 8 p.m. that explores the background, meaning, and dramatic interpretation of that night’s stories.  Also, freshly baked cookies–a different batch at each reading–and tea are available.  Admission free!  Join us every third Tuesday of the month at the Institute Library, 847 Chapel St. Our next reading will be October 18.  Our theme: “Can’t Live with ‘Em.” Our stories: “Chez Lambert” by Jonathan Franzen and “The Magic Barrel” by Bernard Malamud. Please note the Institute Library is one flight up and, most unfortunately, not wheelchair accessible. For more information, visit us at www.institutelibrary.org.

1 2